Category Archives: student leadership

What it means to be a university

There’s much more to the difference between a university and a college than just the title. That’s why we celebrate so fervently during #OrangeCrushWeek, and especially #UNITE!

To celebrate #UNITE this year, we stayed true to the theme of Salem: Halloween. All over campus there were treats including BBQ food, fried carnival food, lemonade and more. At night, there were tricks. There was a murder mystery party at night. We celebrated 6 years of university status with tricks and treats.

Becker College’s website offers a great description of the difference between the two. They are essentially the same in the way that a student is still earning a degree either way, and they both can be either privately or publicly operated. The quality of your degree really depends on the program, and how much the student applies themselves.

Cvs8MzBXEAQY5jD.jpg

What’s interesting is that Becker states that colleges are more hands-on and classroom settings are more intimate. That’s not the case with SSU, however. Salem State University prides itself on its intimate classroom settings where barriers between students and professors do not exist. Most classes are between 20-30 people on average here, so that the professors can pay close attention to each student’s needs.

Further, professors are not only educators, but also mentors to their students. Students and professors can build a strong and mutually beneficial relationship. Professors can be advisors to student organizations and can give access into their Rolodex of powerful connections. Students can give professors insights on the live and interests of millennials. These insights can benefit research and projects that they need the help of students for.

For Salem State, however, being a University is more than just the prestige. It’s about community. Students will be more inclined to stay on a campus where they feel there is a community that they feel welcome. Being a university is a mindset of an accepting culture where everyone wants to see everyone else succeed.

Thank you for all of this last week with us! The more events we come together for as a student body, the more we foster the sense of community on our university’s campus. With such a diverse and inclusive campus, being a university unites (pun intended) us even more!

Cv23MQzWcAE2Vkh.jpg

We were in the Halloween spirit!

Advertisements

Crafting the perfect transition packet

The success of a student organization in an academic year heavily relies on the transition between old and new e-board members. A transition can be different for every organization, however, it is vital that one occurs to begin with. Some students have different traditions such as  old and new e-board dinners, retreats, contracts, meetings, and transition packets. Today, we will be highlighting the importance of one of the transition methods: transition packets. These are packets  distributed from an old e-board member to the new one, including all of the important information regarding each position.

bigstock-teamwork-sign-34770716

Think of it as passing the baton. Picture courtesy of Wild Apricot Blog.

Luckily, every year there is an e-board transition meeting hosted by SGA. It’s only mandatory that one current e-board member be there, but all old and new members are welcome to come! They explain what being a student leader entails. They highlight the importance of attending mandatory SGA meetings, representing student leaders well, and how imperative it is to get in touch with your predecessor to talk about your new position. So, when constructing a transition packet, what exactly should be in it?

 

What to put in a transition packet:

1. When and where your e-board and general body meetings are

2. Passwords to any social media accounts you have

3. Chapter information

If you’re a chapter of a greater organization, put any information regarding that. What is the greater organization? What’s their contact information? How do dues work? Do they have national conferences?

4. Role-specific information

What exactly does the person in role they’re entering do? What are their responsibilities? Who do they report to?

5. Attendance information

What’s the policy of attendance for e-board members? Who do you tell if you can’t make it? What are the consequences of missed meetings/events?

6. SGA Information

How many SGA meetings are there this year? What do they usually cover? Also, include that if your organization is not represented your budget will be cut 5%. Who is the current SGA e-board and how do you contact them? How do you go about reserving rooms, making flyers, depositing funds, etc?

7. Contracts and constitution

Do you have e-board member contracts that bind them to their responsibilities? If they do not have a copy of the constitution already, please attach a copy of it in there, too.

 

Transitioning can be complicated, but creating a plan is essential to keeping a successful student organization running smoothly! Be sure to open the lines of communication between your old e-board and the new. We can’t wait to see what the new year will bring!

 

What could Ellison be? #EllisonCouldBe

The cat is out of the bag, and is all over twitter. Within a few years, the Ellison Campus Center will be receiving the expansion it and the SSU community deserves. However, before Ellison goes under the knife, the architects Dimella Shaffer wants to know what we students really want to see in the campus center. Twitter has been exploding with the hashtag #ellisoncouldbe. Students have been sporting #ellisoncouldbe T shirts, and have been voting via stickers on poster boards for what they want to see. The excitement is growing. Let’s take a look at examples of other campus centers first, to get a feel of what we really could have.

davis10-29-07

The Dudley H. Davis Campus Center on the University of Vermont campus has so many resources. The gorgeous building has a game room, a book nook, green roof and terrace, a diversity and equality lounge, fireplace lounge and gallery, art exhibition, Ben & Jerry’s, a farmers market, a bookstore, and more.

Student Center

The UC Irvine Campus Center has study places, two food courts with a Jamba Juice, Wendy’s, Panda Express, etc. They also have SGA, student media services, UPS, a pub and more.

rey3

The Reynolds Campus Center at Babson College has an ATM, local merchant carts, a resource room including art supplies for poster-making, coffee and food, printing services, a lounge, and more.

So, what have people been asking for on twitter?

#EllisonCouldBe

Tweet us your ideas with the hashtag #ellisoncouldbe!

How To Have A Smooth Eboard Transition

changes-ahead-exit-sign-1024x662

It’s out with the old, and in with the new. It’s that time of year to pass the baton to a new executive board of your group/club.

First of all, congratulations on being a student leader! Leadership roles can help further any career path you choose to pursue. If you’re graduation, congratulations and good luck! If you’re stepping into a new position, we hope your new position is fun and challenging. However, the transition of leaving an old position and stepping into a new one can be a tough transition. Here are some tips to ensure that your successor can be just as successful as you were:

1. Map It Out For Them

Give the new officers a written-down guide of some sort, if you can. A face-to-face meeting is good if they take notes, however, it’s better for them to have a written resource for them to refer to, instead of them constantly asking you questions. If you can take the time to write a handbook for that position, that would be ideal. However, printing out a copy of your constitution with that includes position duties is also a way to do this.

2. Make Them Feel Welcome

A mixer event for the old and new e-board is a great way to break the ice. A group that knows each other better is more likely to be more productive. Get together with the new and old officers, whether it be a dinner, bowling, a movie, or just a get-together. Don’t have any talk of work, just have fun and get to know each other.

3. Tie Loose Ends

If there was a crisis in your club during the year, try your best to handle it before a fresh set of hands take over. It’s easier for a new e-board to be successful with a fresh start. If you can’t, maybe there’s a returning member on the e-board that knows how to handle it.

4. Be A Resource

Whether you’re graduating, or moving onto a new position or club, or just focusing on school, still be a resource to our successor. Let them know that they can contact you with any questions.

 Who’s excited for the next school year? It’s going to be a great year. What are some of your big plans?

Also, we want to hear your ideas for the new ellison campus center! Tweet us your ideas with the hashtag #ellisoncouldbe

ellisoncouldbe